Thursday, December 14, 2017

OCMA Blog

Measles Outbreak Update

Measles has now been confirmed in 22 Orange County (OC) residents, signaling ongoing transmission in the community and at the Disneyland Parks. Thirteen of these cases spent time at the Disneyland Parks since mid-December, 2014. In California, as of today, 59 cases of measles have been confirmed since the end of December; 42 of these had an exposure in December at Disneyland or California Adventure Park. Additional cases have been identified that were at the park while infectious in January, including within the last week. Nine of the OC cases have no Disney or other known measles exposure. Additional cases are expected in Orange County.
 

Of the 22 Orange County cases, five are children, of whom four were not vaccinated and two were hospitalized. Although some of the confirmed cases occurred in people with a history of vaccination, their illness is generally milder and typically not as infectious. Vaccination is critical to prevent the ongoing spread of disease.

  • Although the overall risk of getting measles in Orange County remains low, residents who have not received any measles-containing vaccine should get a dose of MMR vaccine.
  • Two doses of measles-containing vaccine (MMR vaccine) are more than 99% effective in preventing measles. The first dose is routinely given at 12-15 months of age, with the second dose usually at age 4-6 years. The second dose may be given any time ≥28 days after the first dose.
  • All healthcare workers (HCW) should have two documented doses of MMR or serologic evidence of measles immunity. HCW who are exposed to a case of measles may be excluded from work until they provide evidence of immunity.
  • If exposed to measles, all, children and school/child care staff without documented immunity will be removed from work/school/child care from day 7 after the first exposure to day 21 after the last exposure.

Measles is highly contagious and people can be exposed by just being in the same room as a measles case during their infectious period (4 days before onset of rash until 4 days after). Several of the cases have potentially exposed patients in healthcare facilities, resulting in large contact investigations and persons needing immune globulin administration, post-exposure vaccination, or serologic testing for immunity.

  • Any patient suspected of having measles should be masked immediately and promptly moved to a negative pressure room when available. Providers seeing patients in an office or clinic setting should consider options such as arranging to see suspect measles cases after all other patients have left the office, or assessing patients outside of the building to avoid having a potentially infectious patient enter the office.
  • Notify Orange County Public Health Epidemiology immediately at 714-834-8180 (or 714-628-7008 after hours) about any suspect cases. Do not wait for laboratory confirmation before reporting a suspect case. Do NOT refer patients to Public Health without first discussing with one of our staff.
  • DO NOT send potentially infectious suspect measles patients to a reference laboratory for specimen collection.

For more information on measles, see www.ochealthinfo.com/measles.


2015 Young Physicians Patient Safety Award

The Doctors Company Foundation is now accepting essays for the 2015 Young Physicians Patient Safety Award. The annual award recognizes six third- and fourth-year students attending U.S. medical schools who write winning essays about the most instructional patient safety event they have experienced in a clinical rotation. Winners each receive a $5,000 award from The Doctors Company Foundation,which co-sponsors the contest with the Lucian Leape Institute of the National Patient Safety Foundation.
 

For more information on the award and how to apply, please visit www.tdcfoundation.com/2015ypawards. Essays are due by Monday, February 2, 2015 (5:00 PM PST).


Allied Anesthesia Offers Surgery Survival Tips for Parents in the New Year

Contact: 
Paul Yost 714-619-5383
pyost@alliedanesthesia.com
http://www.alliedanesthesia.com/


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Orange, Calif. (Jan. 20, 2015) –Many people see the New Year as a time to reflect, restore and revitalize.

But, for children who are scheduled to have surgery in the New Year, it’s a time for fear and anxiety.

Allied Anesthesia doctors, who provide anesthesia and pain management services at Children’s Hospital of Orange County (CHOC) and other hospitals around the Southland, are committed to ensuring that every pediatric patient they encounter is as comfortable and unafraid as possible, no matter how difficult and dangerous the procedure. 

With that in mind, they have compiled some tips for parents to help make their child’s experience less mysterious and miserable and more positive and productive.

  1. Whether the child is undergoing a minor outpatient procedure or major surgery, it's important for parents to remain calm and reassuring. Children take their cues from their parents. If their parents are worried and anxious, they will be worried and anxious as well. 
  2. It’s best if children and parents have an idea what to expect. There are many age-appropriate books on the market featuring familiar characters such as “A Visit to the Sesame Street Hospital” and “Curious George Goes to the Hospital.”  Sit down with your child and read it together.
  3. Many children are afraid of being alone either before or after the procedure. Hospitals are much more family friendly today than they were in the past.  Parents should assure their children that they will stay with them up until time for the operation and be there waiting for them when they move into recovery.  
  4. Younger children might enjoy playing “doctor” with a doll or stuffed animal.  Parents can purchase a kit with toy instruments and show them how to take the doll’s temperature or listen to its heartbeat. Older children might benefit from a pre-operative tour of the hospital where they will meet members of the hospital staff and become familiar with the rooms, equipment and procedures. 
  5. When talking about medical procedures, avoid using alarming language such as “the doctor will cut you open” or “you’ll be put to sleep,” which young children might equate to what happens when their pets get sick.
  6. Instead of focusing on what the doctor is going to do, focus on the outcome such as “after your knee surgery, you will be able to play baseball again.”

Above all, be honest and reassuring. 

About Allied Anesthesia: With over 100 highly qualified physician anesthesiologists on staff, Allied Anesthesia provides adult and pediatric anesthesia services to St. Joseph Hospital of Orange, CHOC Children’s Hospital, St. Jude Medical Center in Fullerton, San Antonio Community Hospital in Upland, St. Mary’s Hospital in Apple Valley and many other Southern California health care facilities. In 2014, Allied Anesthesia joined with Fullerton Anesthesia Associates and Upland Anesthesia Medical Group to consolidate best practices in more than six hospitals and more than a dozen ambulatory surgery centers. The expanded medical practice is dedicated to offering the highest comprehensive quality of care and the most cost-effective procedures in all facilities they serve. All Allied physician anesthesiologists are board certified in Anesthesiology and they staff and manage the most efficient operating rooms in Southern California. Allied is a member of the California Society of Anesthesiologists, the American Society of Anesthesiologists, and the Anesthesia Quality Institute.  

For more information, visit:  http://www.alliedanesthesia.com

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