Saturday, December 16, 2017

OCMA Blog

New guidance from CDC on Ebola

Below message is from the Orange County HCA / Epidemiology & Assessment

Guidance for Safe Handling of Human Remains of Ebola Patients in U. S. Hospitals and Mortuaries (August 25, 2014) 
http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/hcp/guidance-safe-handling-human-remains-ebola-patients-us-hospitals-mortuaries.html

From Dr. Erin Epson, Assistant Chief / Public Health Medical Officer of the CDPH Healthcare-Associated Infections Program:
CDC has issued Interim Guidance for Environmental Infection Control in Hospitals for Ebola Virus, available at: http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/hcp/environmental-infection-control-in-hospitals.html. Although the role of the environment in transmission of Ebola virus has not been established, in this guidance CDC recommends higher levels of precaution to reduce the potential risk posed by contaminated surfaces in the patient care environment “given the apparent low infectious dose, potential of high virus titers in the blood of ill patients, and disease severity.” Disinfection products with higher potency than what is normally required for an enveloped virus such as Ebola are therefore now recommended. Such products include Environmental Protection Agency-registered hospital disinfectants with a label claim for a non-enveloped virus (e.g. norovirus, rotavirus, adenovirus, poliovirus), and would also include bleach solution. In addition, the new guidance recommends that porous surfaces that cannot be made single use (e.g. carpeting, upholstered furniture and curtains) should be avoided in rooms of suspect Ebola virus disease (EVD) patients, and that potentially contaminated textiles (e.g. linens, non-fluid-impermeable pillows or mattresses, and privacy curtains) be discarded as regulated medical waste. This guidance regarding appropriate disinfection products and management of potentially contaminated textiles is different and replaces the environmental infection control elements of the previously issued Infection Prevention and Control Recommendations for Patients with Known or Suspected Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever in U.S. Hospitals.

CDC has also updated a poster depicting the sequence for putting on and removing personal protective equipment (PPE), available at: http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/pdf/ppe-poster.pdf. This updated poster emphasizes guidance to perform hand hygiene between steps if hands become contaminated, in addition to immediately after removing all PPE. 

There are multiple acceptable sequences and methods for removing PPE. Regardless of the sequence or method used, the important principles are that the most contaminated items are removed first, and that the person removing PPE does not contaminate themselves or others during the process. If two pairs of gloves are used, the most contaminated outer gloves can be removed first and the inner gloves last, in order to limit additional contamination of remaining PPE during removal.  Performing hand hygiene between steps, and especially prior to removal of a mask or respirator, can help prevent contaminating one’s eyes and/or mucous membranes while removing the mask or respirator. Healthcare personnel should familiarize themselves and practice methods of donning and removal of any PPE used, in advance of the time when PPE will be needed. 

Availability of PPE supplies, hand hygiene, and appropriate waste containers at the point needed can be facilitated by placing any suspect EVD patient in a room with an anteroom.  An anteroom is particularly helpful if airborne isolation is implemented and respirators must be removed after leaving the patient room and closing the door. If a room with an anteroom is unavailable, a suspect EVD patient can be placed in a room that is spatially separated from other occupied patient rooms in a low traffic area (e.g., at the end of a hallway), with a designated area for hand hygiene and waste containers outside the room and separate from other patient care areas.

If you have any comments or questions or would like to be added to the distribution list, please email us at epi@ochca.com.


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